UK UFO Files Show High Level Officials Were Concerned

Britain’s Ministry of Defence ceased to collect UFO reports as of December 2009, because, as they put it, “…in over fifty years, no UFO report has revealed any evidence of a potential threat to the United Kingdom.” However, the UFO files being released by the British National Archives contain cases that clearly should be of concern, and I am not alone in this opinion. In fact, the last batch of files includes correspondence between the Ministry of Defence (MOD) and two high level military officials who were adamant that UFO cases should be taken more seriously.

The highest ranking among those hounding the MOD about UFOs was Baron Hill-Norton, former Admiral of the Fleet (1970-71), Chief of the Defence Staff (1971-73), and head of NATO’s military committee (1974-77). Two years after his retirement in 1977, Peter Hill-Norton was made Baron and a member of the House of Lords. As you can see, Lord Hill-Norton was quite an impressive chap and known as a tough and aggressive leader. In other words, he didn’t take no crap.

At some point Lord Hill-Norton took an interest in UFOs, and was unsatisfied with the MOD claiming that they were of no concern. He badgered the MOD with questions, trying to get them to actively investigate important cases. There are over 300 pages of correspondence between Lord Hill-Norton and the MOD in the latest batch of UK UFO files.

Lord Hill-Norton took a particular interest in the Rendlesham forest case. In late December of 1980, several US servicemen witnessed UFO activity over a two day period near the bases of RAF Bentwaters and RAF Woodbridge, both on lease by the US from the UK. The Rendlesham forest surrounds the bases. One of the witnesses included Deputy Base Commander, Charles Halt, who was ordered to forwarded a memo on the incident to the MOD.

In a response dated October 22, 1997 to Minister of State for Defence, Lord Gilbert, who claimed the Rendlesham sightings were not of interest, Lord Hill-Norton wrote:

My position both privately and publicly expressed over the last dozen years or more, is that there are only two possibilities, either:

a. An intrusion into our Air Space and a landing by unidentified craft took place at Rendlesham, as described.

or

b. The Deputy Commander of an operational, nuclear armed, US Air Force Base in England, and a large number of his enlisted men, were either hallucinating or lying.

Either of these simply must be ‘of interest to the Ministry of Defence’, which has been repeatedly denied, in precisely those terms. They, or words very like them, are used again in your letter and I believe, in the light of the above, you would not feel inclined to sign your name to them again.

Further, Lord Hill-Norton pushed Lord Gilbert on the sensitive question of whether there were nuclear arms on the base, which would have been against their agreement with US. Lord Hill-Norton asked Lord Gilbert, “Whether they are aware of reports from the United States Air Force personnel that nuclear weapons stored in the Weapons Storage Area at RAF Woodbridge were struck by light beams fired from an unidentified craft seen over the base in the period 25-30 December 1980, and if so, what action was subsequently taken.”

Lord Gilbert responded, “There is no evidence to suggest that the Ministry of Defence received any such reports.” He continued that he intended “neither to confirm nor to deny where nuclear weapons are located either in the UK or elsewhere, in the past or at the present time.”

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India Maps Out a Nuclear Power Future, Amid Opposition

Fishermen pull mackerel, prawn, and pomfret from their nets near the port of Jaitapur on India’s west coast, as field workers pick the region’s famed Alphonso mangoes.

Even though many homes lack electricity, exports of fish and fruit provide a good living here. So villagers, determined to maintain their way of life, have made clear in protests that escalated after Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi disaster that they do not welcome the new neighbor the Indian government plans to install: The world’s largest nuclear power plant.

Jaitapur is meant to be the flagship location for the Indian nuclear energy renaissance that was mapped years ago by negotiators of a treaty to end the power-hungry nation’s technology isolation. U.S. President George W. Bush’s administration spearheaded the diplomatic effort to clear the way for India to purchase civil nuclear know-how and uranium fuel from Western nations despite India’s refusal to sign the global Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. But progress has been slow under the 2008 civil nuclear cooperation pact; an effort to overcome legal hurdles for U.S. nuclear firms was one of the goals of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit to India this week.

While the U.S. government’s focus has been on easing the stringent liability laws enacted by India’s parliament, a more profound barrier in the world’s largest democracy may be public mistrust and opposition.

“The U.S. interest in promoting nuclear power in India is solely because of their interest in establishing a huge market for [their] power business and not because of any charitable distribution to the power-starved millions in India,” said A. Gopalakhrishnan, former chairman of the Indian Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, in an email.

And it’s not just former government officials like Gopalakhrishnan, but fishers, farmers, and thousands of ordinary citizens who promise a tough road ahead for nuclear power in India—a fact underscored in protests that turned violent this spring at Jaitapur.

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Japan May be Hiding the Extent of its Power Plant Disaster

Scientific experts believe Japan’s nuclear disaster, which started with an earthquake on March 11, which caused a tsunami that destroyed the cooling systems at the Tokyo Electric Power Company’s (TEPCO) nuclear plant in Fukushima, is far worse than the government is revealing.

TEPCO has been spraying water on several of the reactors and fuel cores in order to cool them down, but this has led to radiation being emitted into the air in steam and into the surrounding ocean, generating hundreds of thousands of tons of highly radioactive sea water that has to be disposed of. In Al Jazeera, Dahr Jamail quotes nuclear energy expert Arnold Gundersen as saying, “The problem is how to keep it cool. They are pouring in water and the question is what are they going to do with the waste that comes out of that system, because it is going to contain plutonium and uranium. Where do you put the water?”

The government is giving out radiation monitors to children, and an area 17 times the size of Manhattan that is located close to the power plant has been declared to be uninhabitable–a major problem for a small island nation like Japan. In the US, physician Janette Sherman and epidemiologist Joseph Mangano published a report showing a 35% increase in infant mortality in northwest cities that occurred after the Fukushima meltdown. The 8 cities studied for the report are San Jose, Berkeley, San Francisco, Sacramento, Santa Cruz, Portland, Seattle, and Boise.

Why haven’t we heard more about this in the US? Jamail quotes Japanese nuclear physicist Shoji Sawada as saying, “Most of the reactors in Japan were designed by US companies who did not care for the effects of earthquakes. I think this problem applies to all nuclear power stations across Japan.” And nuclear operator Exelon Corporation, one of the largest employers in Illinois where Barack Obama was a senator, has been one of his biggest campaign contributors.

Jamail quotes Gundersen as saying, “Fukushima is the biggest industrial catastrophe in the history of mankind. We still have radioactive wild boar in Germany, 30 years after Chernobyl.”

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Unidentified Aerial Object Sighted During October 2010 Nuclear Missile Incident

On October 23, 2010, F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyoming temporarily lost the ability to communicate with 50 of its Minuteman III missiles. The five Missile Alert Facilities responsible for launching those ICBMs—Alpha through Echo, comprising the 319th Strategic Missile Squadron—would have been unable to do so during the period of the disruption.

This dramatic story was leaked to Mark Ambinder, a contributing editor at The Atlantic, which published it three days later. The U.S. Air Force then quickly acknowledged the problem, saying that a back-up launch system could have performed the task and claiming that the breakdown had lasted a mere 59 minutes.

However, the latter statement was untrue, according to two missile technicians stationed at F.E. Warren, who say that the communications issue, while intermittent, actually persisted over several hours.

Significantly, these same individuals report sightings by “numerous teams” of an enormous, cigar-shaped craft that maneuvered high above the missile field on the day of the disruption. The huge UFO appeared similar to a World War I German Zeppelin but had no passenger gondola or advertising on its hull, as would a commercial blimp.

The confidential Air Force sources also report that their squadron commander has warned witnesses not to talk to journalists or researchers about “the things they may or may not have seen” in the sky and has threatened severe penalties for anyone violating security. Consequently, these persons must remain anonymous at this time.

The disquieting information was provided to noted researcher and author Robert Hastings who, over the past seven months, has interviewed law enforcement and civilian eyewitnesses to ongoing UFO activity near F.E. Warren’s ICBM sites between September 2010 and April 2011. Hastings has just published a detailed exposé on these developments titled, “Huge UFO Sighted Near Nuclear Missiles During October 2010 Launch System Disruption,” which may be read here.

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