Mystery shrouds objects seen floating above Mumbai airport

Mystery shrouds objects seen floating above Mumbai airport

Mumbai, May 25 (IANS) Mystery continues to shroud four-five small objects that were spotted flying above Mumbai airport on Saturday, with multiple agencies, including the police, probing the matter, official sources said on Monday.

The objects were first sighted by a Jet Airways pilot shortly before he was to take off around 6 p.m.. He alerted the Air Traffic Control (ATC).

The ATC instructed the pilot to abort take off. He exited the main runway and later again came in the queue and finally took off after sometime when the objects seemed to have disappeared after a few minutes.

Despite speculation in various quarters of the objects being remote-controlled parachutes, radio controlled mini-gliders, Chinese lanterns, balloons, etc., official sources preferred to term them simply as ‘unidentified objects’ seen floating for a few minutes in the airport airspace.

They were espied moving at a height of around 150 feet and in a south-north direction countering strong winds blowing from the south-west at that time, pointing to a possibility that they (the objects) were being guided or controlled from terrestrial sources.

The sources declined to speculate on where the objects disappeared, or if they returned on land in the vicinity of the Mumbai International Airport Ltd. (MIAL).

As per available indications, the objects were not picked up by most radars in and around Mumbai, including those belonging to the defence forces.

No agency has lodged a formal complaint with the police so far mainly due to confusion over jurisdiction or territorial issues.

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Vimanas of Ancient India

Flying devices are commonplace in many religions, and Hinduism is no exception. According to ancient Sanskrit texts found a few years ago by Westerners in a South Indian temple, Vimanas were open topped flying devices, restricted to the Earth’s atmosphere.

The origin of the word “vimana” can be found in Sanskrit, even though the Cologne Digital Sanskrit Lexicon doesn’t list it:

vimaanam.h: an aircraft, plane

In its original meaning, vimana refers to flying machines, though, of course, not directly to flying saucers. According to Sanskrit literature professor Prof. Dileep Kumar Kanjilal, Ph.D. of the West Bengal Senior Educational Service:

“In addition to the Vaimanika Shashtra, the Samarangana Sutradhara and the Yuktikalpataru of Bhoja, there are about 150 verses of the Rig Veda, Yajurveda and the Atharvaveda, a lot of literary passages belonging to the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Puranas, the Bhagavata and the Raghuvamsa and some references of the darma Abhijnanasakuntalam of Kalidasa, the Abimaraka of Bhasa, the Jatalas. the Avadhana Literature and of the Kathasaritsagara and a number of literary works contained either references to graphic aerial flight or to the mechanism of the aerial vehicles used in old ages in India.”

Reference to flying vehicles occurred in the Mahabharata in about 41 places of which the air attack of Salva on Krisna’s capital Dwaraka deserve special notice.

The first researcher to spot such unusual flying machines was Lord Desmond Leslie, the friend of contactee George Adamski, in the early 1950’s. Leslie not being a true expert of Sanskrit, his work has been criticized. Dr. Roberto Pinotti, an Italian scientist and ufologist, on October 12, 1988 was a speaker in the World Space Conference in Bangalore, India.

He referred to several Hindu texts and pointed out that Indian gods and heroes fought in the skies using piloted vehicles armed with weapons. These weapons consisted of seven different types of mirrors and lenses, which were used for offensive and defensive purposes. The “Pinjula Mirror” offered a form of visual shield, preventing the pilots from “evil rays”, and the weapon named “Marika” was used to shoot enemy aircraft.

Dr. Pinotti declared that these weapons “do not seem to be too different from what we today call laser technology.” The vehicles themselves were made of special heat absorbing metals, called “Somaka, Sound alike and Mourthwika”.

“In the Vedic literature of India, there are many descriptions of flying machines that are generally called vimanas. These fall into two categories:

  • manmade craft that resemble airplanes and fly with the aid of birdlike wings
  • unstreamlined structures that fly in a mysterious manner and are generally not made by human beings

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Vimanas, Indian Flying Machines

Nearly every Hindu and Buddhist in the world – hundreds of millions of people has heard of the ancient flying machines referred to in the Ramayana and other texts as vimanas.

Vimanas are mentioned even today in standard Indian literature and media reports. An article called “Flight Path” by the Indian journalist Mukul Sharma appeared in the major newspaper The Times of India on April 8, 1999 which talked about vimanas and ancient warfare: according to some interpretations of surviving texts, India’s future it seems happened way back in the past. Take the case of the Yantra Sarvasva, said to have been written by the sage Maharshi Bhardwaj.

This consists of as many as 40 sections of which one, the Vaimanika Prakarana dealing with aeronautics, has 8 chapters, a hundred topics and 500 sutras.

In it Bhardwaj describes vimana, or aerial aircrafts, as being of three classes:

1. those that travel from place to place;

2. those that travel from one country to another;

3. those that travel between planets.

For instance, they had to be:

Impregnable, unbreakable, non-combustible and indestructible capable of coming to a dead stop in the twinkling of an eye; invisible to enemies; capable of listening to the conversations and sounds in hostile planes; technically proficient to see and record things, persons, incidents and situations going on inside enemy planes; know at every stage the direction of the movement of other aircraft in the vicinity; capable of rendering the enemy crew into a state of suspended animation, intellectual torpor or complete loss of consciousness; capable of destruction; manned by pilots and co-travelers who could adapt in accordance with the climate in which they moved; temperature regulated inside; constructed of very light and heat absorbing metals; provided with mechanisms that could enlarge or reduce images and enhance or diminish sounds.

Aerial battles and chases are common in ancient Hindu literature. What did these airships look like? The ancient Mahabharata speaks of a vimana as “an aerial chariot with the sides of iron and clad with wings.”

The Ramayana describes a vimana as a double-deck, circular (cylindrical) aircraft with portholes and a dome. It flew with the “speed of the wind”, and gave forth a “melodious sound” The ancient Indians themselves wrote entire flight manuals on the care and control of various types of vimanas. The Samara Sutradhara is a scientific treatises dealing with every possible facet of air travel in a vimana. There are 230 stanzas dealing with construction, take-off, cruising for thousands of miles, normal and forced landings, and even possible collusions with birds!

In 1875, the Vymaanika-Shaastra, a fourth century BC text written by Maharshi Bhardwaj, was discovered in a temple in India. The book dealt with the operation of ancient vimanas and included information on steering, precautions for long flights, protection of the airships from storms and lightning, and how to switch the drive to solar energy, or some other “free energy” source, possibly some sort of “gravity drive.”

The ancient Indian epics go into considerable detail about aerial warfare over 10,000 years ago.

So much detail that a famous Oxford professor included a chapter on the subject in a book on ancient warfare!. According to the Sanskrit scholar V.R.Ramachandran Dikshitar, the Oxford Professor who wrote “War in Ancient India in 1944 “,  no question can be more interesting in the present circumstances of the world than India’s contribution to the science of aeronautics. There are numerous illustrations in our vast Puranic and epic literature to show how well and wonderfully the ancient Indians conquered the air.

The description of these machines in old Indian texts are amazingly precise.

There were 113 subdivisions of these four main types that differed only in minor details. The position and functioning of the solar energy collectors are described in the Vaimanika Shastra. It says that eight tubes had to be made of special glass absorbing the sun’s ray. A whole series of details are listed, some of which we do not understand. The Amaranganasutradhara even explains the drive, the controls and the fuel for the flying machine. It says that quicksilver and ‘Rasa’ were used. Unfortunately we do not yet know what “Rasa’ was.

Ten sections deal with uncannily topical themes such as pilot training, flight paths, the individual parts of flying machines, as well as clothing for pilots and passengers, and the food recommended for long flights.

There was much technical detail: the metals used, heat-absorbing metals and their melting point, the propulsion units and various types of flying machines. The information about metals used in construction name three sorts, somala, soundaalika and mourthwika. If they were mixed in the right proportions, the result was 16 kinds of heat-absorbing metals with names like ushnambhara, ushnapaa, raajaamlatrit, etc. which cannot be translated into English.

The texts also explained how to clean metals, the acids such as lemon or apple to be used and the correct mixture, the right oils to work with and the correct temperature for them. Seven types of engine are described with the special functions for which they are suited and the altitudes at which they work best.

India Maps Out a Nuclear Power Future, Amid Opposition

Fishermen pull mackerel, prawn, and pomfret from their nets near the port of Jaitapur on India’s west coast, as field workers pick the region’s famed Alphonso mangoes.

Even though many homes lack electricity, exports of fish and fruit provide a good living here. So villagers, determined to maintain their way of life, have made clear in protests that escalated after Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi disaster that they do not welcome the new neighbor the Indian government plans to install: The world’s largest nuclear power plant.

Jaitapur is meant to be the flagship location for the Indian nuclear energy renaissance that was mapped years ago by negotiators of a treaty to end the power-hungry nation’s technology isolation. U.S. President George W. Bush’s administration spearheaded the diplomatic effort to clear the way for India to purchase civil nuclear know-how and uranium fuel from Western nations despite India’s refusal to sign the global Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. But progress has been slow under the 2008 civil nuclear cooperation pact; an effort to overcome legal hurdles for U.S. nuclear firms was one of the goals of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit to India this week.

While the U.S. government’s focus has been on easing the stringent liability laws enacted by India’s parliament, a more profound barrier in the world’s largest democracy may be public mistrust and opposition.

“The U.S. interest in promoting nuclear power in India is solely because of their interest in establishing a huge market for [their] power business and not because of any charitable distribution to the power-starved millions in India,” said A. Gopalakhrishnan, former chairman of the Indian Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, in an email.

And it’s not just former government officials like Gopalakhrishnan, but fishers, farmers, and thousands of ordinary citizens who promise a tough road ahead for nuclear power in India—a fact underscored in protests that turned violent this spring at Jaitapur.

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Ancient Aliens The Series: Aliens and the Third Reich

This episode speculates that Nazi Germany had experimented with advanced alien technology and built flying machines; such as the Haunebu and the Die Glocke (The Bell); and rumors that some of this technology may have made its way to the United States and helped jump start the Apollo program.