India Maps Out a Nuclear Power Future, Amid Opposition

Fishermen pull mackerel, prawn, and pomfret from their nets near the port of Jaitapur on India’s west coast, as field workers pick the region’s famed Alphonso mangoes.

Even though many homes lack electricity, exports of fish and fruit provide a good living here. So villagers, determined to maintain their way of life, have made clear in protests that escalated after Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi disaster that they do not welcome the new neighbor the Indian government plans to install: The world’s largest nuclear power plant.

Jaitapur is meant to be the flagship location for the Indian nuclear energy renaissance that was mapped years ago by negotiators of a treaty to end the power-hungry nation’s technology isolation. U.S. President George W. Bush’s administration spearheaded the diplomatic effort to clear the way for India to purchase civil nuclear know-how and uranium fuel from Western nations despite India’s refusal to sign the global Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty. But progress has been slow under the 2008 civil nuclear cooperation pact; an effort to overcome legal hurdles for U.S. nuclear firms was one of the goals of U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s visit to India this week.

While the U.S. government’s focus has been on easing the stringent liability laws enacted by India’s parliament, a more profound barrier in the world’s largest democracy may be public mistrust and opposition.

“The U.S. interest in promoting nuclear power in India is solely because of their interest in establishing a huge market for [their] power business and not because of any charitable distribution to the power-starved millions in India,” said A. Gopalakhrishnan, former chairman of the Indian Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, in an email.

And it’s not just former government officials like Gopalakhrishnan, but fishers, farmers, and thousands of ordinary citizens who promise a tough road ahead for nuclear power in India—a fact underscored in protests that turned violent this spring at Jaitapur.

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The Message of the Pleiadians

First hand contact by aliens from the Pleiades; are such startling claims amazing fact or outrageous fabrications? What meaningful information could these cosmic visitors possibly offer to Earth humans? Does a new Quantum-Physics world-view corroborate insights shared by these star-travelers? Does their ‘message’ foreshadow a revolutionary social/technological transformation of the human race? Judge the evidence.

UFO Expert Believes “Something Strange” is going on in Scotland’s Skies

It’s hard to imagine the industrial town of Bonnybridge near Falkirk as a portal to another dimension but the everyday hustle and bustle of the area hides a more mysterious and sinister background.

Nicknamed the ‘UFO capital of Scotland’, Bonnybridge is a hotspot for extra-terrestrial activity and people from around the world have come to the town to gaze at the skies above. Some reports state there are over 300 UFO sightings a year in the town alone.

UFO expert and author of ‘Beyond the Falkirk Triangle,’ Ronald Halliday believes that Scotland’s twilight zone isn’t just restricted to the Falkirk area and there are strange lights to be seen all over the country. Is there something strange going on in Scotland’s skies?

Speaking to The Hour Ronald said: “People do have close up encounters and people do claim to have seen things that are very hard to explain right away.

“There have been thousands of reported sightings in Scotland and in fact the country has been labeled the UFO capital of the world. There has even been some suggestion that Scotland acts as a window into another dimension.

“Again, there have been thousands of reported sightings of UFOs in Bonnybridge over the years and all sort of strange things have been happening. People from all over the world have gone there to see if they can spot something. If you want to see a UFO come to Scotland.”

The release of previously confidential MOD files by the National Archive in 2008 unraveled further suspicions of potential unidentified objects in Scotland’s skies.

From 1940 onwards various eyewitness accounts have included everything from mysterious beams of light in Lennoxtown to an alleged abduction in Livingston.

Despite its reputation as a hotspot for alien activity, Ronald insists that it has never been more important to validate potential sightings and check for signs of false or natural explanations.

“I think we have got to be critical about the whole thing. You can’t accept every claim that someone has seen something strange unless there is real evidence; you have to evaluate it and take a look to see if we can explain it through science or natural phenomenon.

“People think they have seen something strange but when you take a look and investigate it you find out that really there is nothing behind it.”

However, one would be advised to keep your eyes on the Scottish skies for now. As the use of camera-phones and handheld recording equipment grows, so too does the chance of spotting a UFO – just make sure to wear a warm jacket.

“I’d advice [UFO hunters] to take a very warm coat and be prepared to spend some time in an isolated spot. You don’t want to be near a city.”

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